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Energy/Water Issues

WRA
By the Numbers

  • 40,000: Number of pamphlets to educate residential/commercial customers about the connections between saving water and saving energy
  • 6.3 billion gallons: Volume of water saved annually by clean energy policies in the Mountain West
  • 3: Number of western states that now require electric utilities to consider water in their long-term resource plans.

 

Hoover Dam

In the West, our energy and water supplies are inextricably linked - water supplies are pumped over hundreds of miles, and large thermoelectric coal and nuclear plants consume large amounts of water each year. Population growth and climate change further compound the challenge. Western Resource Advocates works to promote energy policies that protect the region's valuable water resources and air quality - advocating for energy supplies like wind, solar, and energy efficiency that require no water, and advancing water policies, including conservation, that reduce our energy footprint.

The Water/Energy Nexus

Ever wondered about the connection between energy and water? Or thought about how drought might impact electricity? Stacy Tellinghuisen, Senior Energy/Water Policy Analyst at Western Resource Advocates, explains how these two seemingly different issues are more connected than you might think. Using the 2011 drought in Texas as an example, Tellinghuisen explains how the connection between energy and water becomes even more apparent during times of drought. Recent droughts have had unexpected - and unprecedented - impacts on the energy sector, impacting both electricity demands and power plants' ability to meet them.

The Water/Energy Nexus from Western Resource Advocates